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Sky Factory, Inc.

Contact

  • David Navarrete
  • Tel: +1 866-759-3228
  • Web:
  • Address:
    PO Box 1177 Fairfield
    52556 Iowa

Details

  • Cost: £0.00

  • Duration: 30 minutes

  • Venue: BIID Knowledge Hub

  • Regions: Worldwide

Part I - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space (Online)

Part I - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space (Online)

In this course we explore the impact of deep plan buildings on human performance.

Studies have confirmed that interiors that isolate occupants from a meaningful visual connection to nature dampen cognitive function and wellness.

Part I, introduces how our biological experience of daylight impacts our cognitive function. We review the biology of visual processing and its circadian dimension. We analyze how tunable lighting systems that reduce the natural light of the sky to irradiance and color temperature are inevitably limited.

The environmental framework of sky must be introduced if the third essential element of natural light—its spatial nature—is to be present.

Part I also covers how the spatial context in which we perceive daylight presents an opportunity to engage the spatial maps of previously experienced environments stored by our memory. By mimicking these spatial maps, designers can make space with the proper contextual and environmental cues.

To access this e-learning please log on to the BIID Knowledge Hub

Details

  • Cost: £0.00

  • Duration: 30 minutes

  • Venue: BIID Knowledge Hub

  • Regions: Worldwide

Part II - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space (Online)

In Part II, we explore the hidden impact of enclosed interiors. Citing published studies, we explore the limited success building standards like BREEAM, WELL, and LEED have encountered when dealing with isolated interiors. Viable solutions to mitigate the deleterious impact of isolated interiors require a new cognitive architecture: one based on our hardwired habits of perception.

Part II delves into environmental design and the mechanics of perception. We analyze the internal algorithms that make up spatial cognition, including the relevance of environmental context in modulating visual signal intensity. We also discuss the roles played by focused and peripheral vision, including the latter’s key function in setting a subconscious emotional tone or sense of place that we intuit upon entering interiors.

To access this e-learning please log on to the BIID Knowledge Hub

Details

  • Cost: £0.00

  • Duration: 30 Minutes

  • Venue: BIID Knowledge Hub

  • Regions: Worldwide

Part III - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space (Online)

In the concluding segment of our course, we discuss human perception and spatial design in relation to clinical environments. Whereas studies have shown that nature imagery brings an element of positive distraction to enclosed interiors, until cutting-edge research by Sky Factory, Texas Tech University, and Covenant Health, no one had explored the restorative benefits of multisensory sky images.

When photographic sky images are designed to proper scale and perspective, in addition to about 20 other design and compositional elements, the resultant multisensory images contain strong spatial cues. When such Open Sky CompositionsTM are staged within an architectural setting on the ceiling plane, they generate a vivid illusion of open space that engages spatial cognition. A similar framework can also create the illusion of open space on walls.

This cognitive design framework proposes the restorative value of perceived open space in its two essential orientations: the perceived zenith and perceived horizon line. In contrast to how we perceive these spatial reference frames outdoors, in enclosed interiors where such reference frames are often not visible, staging these multisensory cues alters our experience of interior space.

Restoring these fundamental spatial reference frames through a valid multisensory illusion reveals a range of wellness benefits normally associated with interiors applying biophilic design principles.

To access this e-learning please log on to the BIID Knowledge Hub